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criminal-defense-process Archives

Criminal Defense and the Use of Experts

By Robert G. Stahl Esq., NJ & NY Criminal Defense Lawyer posted in Criminal Defense Process, Attorney-Client Privilege on Tuesday, February 19, 2019


In many cases, defense attorneys utilize various experts to assist in their defense of a client. Those experts may include private investigators, forensic accountants, psychologists, DNA analysts, accident reconstruction analysis and economists. While experts can provide invaluable assistance in understanding the prosecution’s theory of the case and in analyzing and attacking the government’s evidence, special care must be taken to protect and preserve the attorney-client and work-product privileges.

Tags: Criminal Defense Process, Attorney-Client Privilege

Cooperating Plea Agreement in Federal Criminal Cases

By Robert G. Stahl Esq., NJ & NY Criminal Defense Lawyer posted in Criminal Defense, Federal Crimes, Criminal Investigation, Criminal Defense Process, Plea Agreement on Thursday, July 13, 2017

Just the other day, "Bridgegate" cooperator and former Port Authority of New York and New Jersey official David Wildstein, was sentenced in federal court to probation. The two defendants that he cooperated against were sentenced to 24 months and 19 months in federal prison. Despite the fact that Wildstein pled guilty to two counts of conspiracy for his role in the offense, and faced several years in prison, the sentencing judge granted the government’s downward departure motion for a much more lenient sentence – in this case probation.

Tags: Criminal Defense, Federal Crimes, Criminal Investigation, Criminal Defense Process, Plea Agreement

What is a Plea Bargain or Plea Agreement?

By Robert G. Stahl Esq., NJ & NY Criminal Defense Lawyer posted in Federal Crimes, Pleading, Criminal Defense Process on Wednesday, May 31, 2017

A plea agreement is the negotiated resolution of a criminal case between the government and the defense when the client decides to plead guilty rather than fighting the charges at trial. The benefit of a plea agreement is that the plea is usually to a lower offense or a limited number of charges rather than to the most severe charge(s). In most instances, a defendant is rewarded in some fashion for pleading guilty rather than going to trial.

Tags: Federal Crimes, Pleading, Criminal Defense Process

NJ Reverses Order Requiring Written Oral Defense Witness Statements

By Andrew Olesnycky Esq., NJ & NY Criminal Defense Lawyer posted in Criminal Discovery, Pre-Trial Procedures, Trial Strategy, Criminal Trial Law, Criminal Defense Process on Wednesday, May 3, 2017

On May 2, 2017, the New Jersey Supreme Court beat back an attempt by prosecutors and a lower court judge to require a defendant to create and turn over evidence prior to trial over the defendant’s objection that doing so violated his right to remain silent. In State v. Tier, the Supreme Court clarified an issue that often causes a great deal of argument in the days leading up to criminal trials: the extent to which and in what form a defendant must provide the State with statements by witnesses who are expected to testify for the defense. In ruling for the defense, the Supreme Court provided criminal defendants with a valuable precedential opinion by which to combat overly-aggressive attempts by the State to shift the burden onto the defendant to produce evidence before trial.

Tags: Criminal Discovery, Pre-Trial Procedures, Trial Strategy, Criminal Trial Law, Criminal Defense Process

What is an Arrest Warrant?

By Robert G. Stahl Esq., NJ & NY Criminal Defense Lawyer posted in Criminal Defense, Criminal Defense Process on Monday, April 10, 2017
An arrest warrant is, in many cases, the formal start of a criminal case against an individual. It is a sworn written recitation of enough “facts” of the case that demonstrate to a judge that there is probable cause to believe that a crime(s) has been committed and the at the defendant committed the alleged crime(s). 

Tags: Criminal Defense, Criminal Defense Process

What is a Search Warrant?

By Robert G. Stahl Esq., NJ & NY Criminal Defense Lawyer posted in Criminal Defense Process on Tuesday, March 14, 2017

The Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution protects us from unreasonable searches and seizures. Unlike a warrantless stop and search of a car or of a person walking down the street, when law enforcement searches a home or business they have usually obtained a search warrant to do so. A search warrant must be issued by a neutral and detached magistrate (judge); be supported by probable cause; and describe in detail the place to be searched and the things to be seized.

Tags: Criminal Defense Process

Expanding the Use of Experts in Criminal Cases

By Robert G. Stahl Esq., NJ & NY Criminal Defense Lawyer posted in Criminal Defense, Investigation, Experts, Criminal Defense Process on Wednesday, February 1, 2017

           In many types of criminal cases, the right expert can be invaluable.  Whether it is a forensic accountant in a complex fraud or tax investigation; a medical or billing expert in a healthcare fraud investigation; a forensic psychiatrist for a sex abuse or child pornography case; a computer expert for a computer crimes matter; or a drug or gang expert in a serious drug case, the proper expert retained early in the investigation can assist the client’s criminal defense attorney in his or her efforts to prevent the charges from being filed, or to develop a solid defense to aid in plea negotiations or to prevail at trial.

Tags: Criminal Defense, Investigation, Experts, Criminal Defense Process

United States Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations

By Robert G. Stahl Esq., NJ & NY Criminal Defense Lawyer posted in Organizational Offenders, Criminal Defense Process on Thursday, January 19, 2017

The United States Sentencing Guidelines provides federal judges with a set of guidelinesto calculate an appropriate and "reasonable" sentence in criminal cases. These guidelines are intended to encourage fair and consistent sentencing proportionate to the magnitude of the crime committed. In most cases, sentencing guidelines suggest a range of months to years of prison time, in addition to a period of supervised release.  Other sentences may call for a period opf probation, or a number of hours of community service. However, when the defendant in a criminal action is a corporation or similar organization, the recommended sentences must change. It’s impossible to put a corporation in jail (though individual employees or members may be co-defendants and may face prison time for their own charges).

Tags: Organizational Offenders, Criminal Defense Process

Pretrial Suppression Motion

By Robert G. Stahl Esq., NJ & NY Criminal Defense Lawyer posted in Criminal Defense, Criminal Defense Process on Monday, December 19, 2016

One of the most critical principles outlined in the United States Constitution is the idea that every person has certain rights that must be upheld and protected, even when that person is accused of or suspected of committing a crime. These protections benefit everyone, guilty and innocent alike, and one of the first things an experienced criminal defense attorney will do in preparing your case is determine whether any of your rights were violated in the course of the investigation conducted by law enforcement that led to your being charged with a crime. If any grounds exist on which to claim that your constitutional rights were violated, your attorney can rectify this by filing a pretrial suppression motion to exclude from consideration any evidence that law enforcement obtained by means of that violation.

Tags: Criminal Defense, Criminal Defense Process

How Bond or Bail is Determined for Criminal Cases

By Robert G. Stahl Esq., NJ & NY Criminal Defense Lawyer posted in Criminal Defense, Criminal Defense Process on Wednesday, December 14, 2016

When a person is arrested and charged with a crime, they are in most cases entitled to bail. Bail is not supposed to be punitive, rather it is designed to help insure that the person charged attends all court appearances and follows all conditions of release set by the court. Standard conditions may include travel restrictions to the state, no additional arrests, to report any contact with law enforcement (including motor vehicle stops), surrender of all weapons, regular reporting to pretrial services, and an order against contacting the alleged victim, if applicable.

Tags: Criminal Defense, Criminal Defense Process

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